catch


catch
catch vb
1 Catch, capture, trap, snare, entrap, ensnare, bag are comparable when meaning to get into one's possession or under one's control either by taking or seizing or by means of skill, craft, or trickery.
Catch, the ordinary and general term of this group, distinctively implies that the thing laid hold of has been in flight, in concealment, or in constant movement and that possession has been gained by pursuit, force, strategy, or surprise or by means of a device or accident which brings it within one's reach physically, visually, or mentally
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after several days' search the detectives caught the murderer

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not able to catch the man who snatched her purse

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catch fish

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catch a ball

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catch a pupil cheating in an examination

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his eyes caught the skirt of her dress— Dickens

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Yancey Cravat caught the word beneath his teeth and spat it back— Ferber

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he smiled back like a child caught in a lie— Steinbeck

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Sometimes the power of laying hold of is ascribed not to a person, his vision or other sense, or his mind, heart, or imagination but to the thing which draws to itself his attention, his eye, or his fancy
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the fact caught her interest, just as sometimes a point in a wide dull landscape catches the eyeDeland

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two recent imports . . . offer striking new surprises which may catch unaware even the veteran reader— Anthony Boucher

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Capture implies heavier odds (as greater opposition or difficulty or more competition) than does catch and suggests a taking possession that amounts to an overcoming or a victory
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capture a stronghold of the enemy

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capture a company of retreating soldiers

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he was making plans ... to capture the banking of the country— Belloc

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no artist can set out to capture charm; he will toil all the night and take nothing— Benson

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Trap, snare, entrap, and ensnare imply catching by a device which holds the one caught in a position that is fraught with danger or difficulty or from which escape is difficult or impossible. Trap and snare imply the use of a trap or snare (see LURE n) but entrap and ensnare suggest trickery in capture more often than the use of an actual trap or snare: all four terms impute craft to the catcher and unwariness or lack of caution to the one that is caught. Distinctively, trap and entrap suggest a being held in a position where one is at the mercy of the captor and his designs, and snare and ensnare a being held so that the more one struggles the more desperate becomes one's situation
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trap an animal

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snare a bird

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trap a detachment of soldiers with an ambush

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themselves in bloody toils were snaredScott

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as if he would clear away some entanglement which had entrapped his thoughts— Bromfield

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entrap a person by a sudden question into making a dangerous admission

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Sympathetic to the regime that ensnared them in its monstrous net— B. D. Wolfe

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Bag carried a double implication of catching (as game or specimens) and of putting into a container (as a game bag) for transportation or storage
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he bagged several rare butterflies within the last month

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bag pheasants

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So strong is the implication of catching and killing game in this use that the word is often employed without suggestion of putting in a bag
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they bagged three bears on their last hunting expedition

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bagged the British rights to John Hersey's Hiroshima while other English publishers were asleep— Cerf

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Analogous words: seize, *take, grasp, grab, clutch, snatch: apprehend, *arrest
Antonyms: miss
2 *incur, contract

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • catch — [ katʃ ] n. m. • 1919; mot angl., abrév. de catch as catch can « attrape comme tu peux » ♦ Lutte très libre à l origine, codifiée aujourd hui. Prise de catch. Match, rencontre de catch, spectacle de cette lutte. Catch à quatre. Catch féminin. ●… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Catch — Catch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Caught}or {Catched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Catching}. Catched is rarely used.] [OE. cacchen, OF. cachier, dialectic form of chacier to hunt, F. chasser, fr. (assumend) LL. captiare, for L. capture, V. intens. of capere to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • catch — [kach, kech] vt. caught, catching [ME cacchen < Anglo Fr cachier < VL * captiare < L captare, to seize < pp. of capere, to take hold: see HAVE] 1. to seize and hold, as after a chase; capture 2. to seize or take by or as by a trap,… …   English World dictionary

  • Catch 5 — is a popular news music package and image campaign developed for Cleveland, Ohio television station WEWS TV in 1970. Written and composed by then jingle writer Frank Gari, the package was subsequently used on a few other American TV stations. The …   Wikipedia

  • catch — [kætʆ] verb caught PTandPP [kɔːt ǁ kɒːt] [transitive] 1. be caught in something to be in a situation that is difficult to escape from: • The government is caught in the middle of the dispute. • The yen was caught in a downward spiral. 2 …   Financial and business terms

  • catch — ► VERB (past and past part. caught) 1) intercept and hold (something thrown, propelled, or dropped). 2) seize or take hold of. 3) capture after a chase or in a trap, net, etc. 4) be in time to board (a train, bus, etc.) or to see (a person,… …   English terms dictionary

  • Catch-22 — ist der Titel des 1961 erschienenen ersten Romans von Joseph Heller über die Absurdität des Krieges und die Dummheit der Militär Maschinerie. Das anfangs wenig erfolgreiche Buch wurde erst durch Mundpropaganda und Weitergabe und Empfehlung des… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Catch — or caught may refer to:In sports: * Catch (baseball), a maneuver in baseball * Caught (cricket), a method of getting out in cricket * Catch or Reception (American football)In music: * Catch (music), a form of round * Catch (band), an English band …   Wikipedia

  • catch — catch; catch·er; catch·ing; catch·man; catch·ment; catch·pole; see·catch; un·catch·able; catch·ing·ly; catch·poll; …   English syllables

  • Catch — Catch, n. 1. Act of seizing; a grasp. Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster] 2. That by which anything is caught or temporarily fastened; as, the catch of a gate. [1913 Webster] 3. The posture of seizing; a state of preparation to lay hold of, or of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • catch — s.n. Gen de lupte libere în care sunt permise aproape orice mijloace pentru înfrângerea adversarului. [pr.: checi. – var.: catch can (pr.: checi chén) s.n.] cuv. engl. Trimis de valeriu, 03.03.2003. Sursa: DEX 98  CATCH [pr …   Dicționar Român


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